Calendar

Feb
6
Fri
13th Annual New Works Exhibition
Feb 6 – Mar 28 all-day

What have you been making? The Jacksonville Center for The Arts invites you to ring in the New Year by sharing your current creative inspirations in the 13th Annual NEW works exhibition. This yearly exhibit is a continuing reflection of the artistic growth within our community. All media welcome. Artwork must have been created within the last year and not previously shown at the Center.

Opening reception on Saturday, February 14.

Applications due: Monday, January 12

http://jacksonvillecenter.org/at-the-center/hayloft-gallery/

Feb
12
Thu
Blue Mountain Elementary Youth Art Exhibit
Feb 12 – Apr 6 all-day
Mar
1
Sun
Beginning Metalsmithing
Mar 1 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Students will be introduced to many techniques that will allow them to manipulate metal to create jewelry and/or small sculptural objects.This is a highly technical discipline, and as such, mastering individual techniques will be emphasized and applied to 2 specific projects. In addition, each student will be encouraged to use principles of basic design and personal expressiveness to produce unique, functional and sculptural pieces. Course objectives: 1- To provide knowledge of and insight into contemporary jewelry and metalsmithing practices. The basic techniques of sawing, filing, soldering, surface texture (stamping, hammering, heat textures, overlay and solder inlay), and simple fold forming/bending will be covered and applied to individual unique design ideas. 2- To begin to conceptualize in the third dimension and/or translate 2 dimensional ideas into 3-D forms. Each piece designed will have height, width, and depth and still be “wearable”. 3- To become familiar with contemporary styles and design trends in metalsmithing by looking at the work of many artists working in the field. 4- To develop observation, critical thinking and problem solving skills as they apply to wearable art. On the development of skills: Jewelry and fine metal work is essentially sculpture. However, there are two important differences: scale and function. You need to think of your designs as sculptural, but at the same time they must be functional (wearable) and small in scale. With that in mind, the designs you pursue in this class should go way beyond what we typically see in mass produced jewelry – the idea here is to be fresh and innovative. Practice of the techniques is imperative (especially when working with silver). Paper models and copper prototypes are helpful. Unlike painting or drawing, there is very little opportunity for redo’s in metal. Every step of metal work is semi-permanent. It is very difficult to change a design or erase aspects once it has been partially executed in metal. So much of metalsmithing is centered on hand skills and tool application and thus these will be emphasized. However, I do not want to let that overshadow the importance of the conceptual aspects of the work. Keep in mind that your design concepts can be social, political, global, or personal and I hope that in teaching you the techniques I can strengthen your aesthetics and concepts.

Nell Fredericksen took time off between a MS in Zoology and beginning a PhD program and took classes in pottery, stained glass and metalsmithing. When her PhD funding fell through, she turned to the arts and as a result has been a professional artist and fine art jeweler for over 20 years. She has never lost the fascination and wonder she feels in connection with nature and has continued work as a wildlife biologist through the years. After spending 6 years in Bolivia, Nell and her husband (and then baby boy) moved to Ferrum, where she has reestablished her studio and art career. Learn More about the Instructor at: http://www.nellfredericksen.com/mm5/merchant.mvc

Mar
2
Mon
Floyd Quilter’s Guild
Mar 2 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

This organization establishes a framework within which experienced and beginning quilters may learn from one another, sharing techniques and quilting advances; and to foster within the community an awareness of quilting as both a historical and a living creative contribution to our lives as a community. – See more at: http://jacksonvillecenter.org/at-the-center/clubs/#sthash.Xtrn7yJd.dpuf

Mar
3
Tue
Life Drawing Group
Mar 3 @ 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

The purpose of the group is to study the human form from an artistic standpoint; for this purpose the model will be nude, as is the tradition. No instruction will be provided. The moderator will keep time and call breaks for the model.

Anyone artist (18 and over) in the community wishing to draw from the model is invited to participate for a fee of $15.00 per person. Any funds collected above paying the model’s fee will be donated to The Jacksonville Center.

Participants will need to bring their own easels, drawing boards, and all other drawing materials they wish to use. Non-drawing persons will not be allowed in the room.

Mar
4
Wed
Open Ceramics Studio
Mar 4 @ 1:00 pm – 6:00 pm

$5 per person. All clay and tools provided. No instruction, however a studio assistant is available for help.

Mar
7
Sat
Beginning Hot Glass
Mar 7 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Play with fire and get rewarded! This introductory class will have students creating beautiful glass beads using a flameworking bench torch and rods of different colored soft glass. Students in this class will learn about the equipment and safety precautions necessary to safely work soft glass into a variety of unique beads. From choosing beautiful color combinations, to swirling and texturing, students will walk away with a number of glass beads ready to be used in their next jewelry project or gifted to a friend! Completion of this class will qualify students to rent the center’s glass studio on an individual basis and join the Glass Club, which meets monthly.
Lara Davis Phelps discovered glass in her last year of college at RISD. Lara went back to school at the Appalachian Center for Crafts where she met her husband and discovered bead making. Building a studio, starting a business, and having a family are her current focus. She lives in Floyd with her husband and two kids.

Lamp Series: Large Vessels Using Slab Clay Techniques
Mar 7 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Everyone needs a new and interesting lamp. How about making one on your own? Join Jayn Avery in the Ceramics Studio at The Jax as she demonstrates hand building clay techniques to make your own large vessel lamp body. Jayn is a regionally known ceramicist and one of The Jacksonville Center’s founders. Her broad knowledge in hand building techniques will allow even the most novice maker the ability to create their own unique clay vessel that can become a lamp body. All materials and tools needed will be provided by the center. Bisque and glaze firing of the vessels will be done at center as well for no additional charge. The workshop will be broken into two parts. During the first and second day of the workshop, students will build with wet clay using slab and extruded clay, build bigger with leather hard clay and add interest with detail and carving. On the third day, separated by two weeks, students will return to their bisque fired vessel to learn about glazing and add glaze colors. Vessels will be available approximately one week later, once they have been fired in the kiln one more time.

Jayn Avery is a self-taught potter/sculptor/writer living in Floyd County, Virginia. The direction of her life was changed by one introductory class in pottery taken at Cornell University while she was a student working on her MS in environmental education. She founded Blue Heron Pottery in 1975 and her unique functional lace-impressed slabwork has become a Floyd County exemplar. As an advocate of simple living, she bases her technique on the principles of least cost, least equipment, and maximum use of available resources. Her teaching emphasis is on personal creativity and resourcefulness. www.blueheronpotterystudio.com

Mar
8
Sun
Bead Club
Mar 8 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm

This is an instructor organized club. Participants must have some glass experience prior to meeting. RSVP is necessary, please contact The Jax.

Lamp Series: Large Vessels Using Slab Clay Techniques
Mar 8 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Everyone needs a new and interesting lamp. How about making one on your own? Join Jayn Avery in the Ceramics Studio at The Jax as she demonstrates hand building clay techniques to make your own large vessel lamp body. Jayn is a regionally known ceramicist and one of The Jacksonville Center’s founders. Her broad knowledge in hand building techniques will allow even the most novice maker the ability to create their own unique clay vessel that can become a lamp body. All materials and tools needed will be provided by the center. Bisque and glaze firing of the vessels will be done at center as well for no additional charge. The workshop will be broken into two parts. During the first and second day of the workshop, students will build with wet clay using slab and extruded clay, build bigger with leather hard clay and add interest with detail and carving. On the third day, separated by two weeks, students will return to their bisque fired vessel to learn about glazing and add glaze colors. Vessels will be available approximately one week later, once they have been fired in the kiln one more time.

Jayn Avery is a self-taught potter/sculptor/writer living in Floyd County, Virginia. The direction of her life was changed by one introductory class in pottery taken at Cornell University while she was a student working on her MS in environmental education. She founded Blue Heron Pottery in 1975 and her unique functional lace-impressed slabwork has become a Floyd County exemplar. As an advocate of simple living, she bases her technique on the principles of least cost, least equipment, and maximum use of available resources. Her teaching emphasis is on personal creativity and resourcefulness. www.blueheronpotterystudio.com